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A person's first language, native language or mother tongue is the language that was learned first by the person. Correspondingly, the person is called a native speaker of the language, although one may also be a native speaker of more than one language if all of the languages are learned naturally without formal instruction, such as through cultural immersion before puberty. Often a child learns the basics of his or her first languages from his or her family.

The terms first, native, and mother can be misleading. It is quite possible that the first language learned is no longer a speaker's dominant language, and therefore no longer the first language. Young immigrant children, whose families have moved to a new linguistic environment may lose, in part or in totality, the language they first acquired.
Good skills in one's native languages are essential for further learning, as a native language is thought to be a base of thinking. Incomplete first language skills often make learning other languages difficult. Native language has therefore a central role in education.

The term "mother tongue" should not be interpreted to mean that it is the language of one's mother. In some paternal societies, the wife moves in with the husband and thus may have a different first language, or dialect, than the local language of the husband. Yet their children usually only speak their local language. Only a few will learn to speak their mothers' languages like natives. Mother in this context probably originated from the definition of mother as source, or origin; as in mother-country or land.
One can have two or more native languages, thus being a native bilingual or indeed multilingual. The order in which these languages are learned is not necessarily the order of proficiency. For instance, a French-speaking couple might have a daughter who learned French first, then English; but if she grew up in the United States, she is likely to become more proficient in English.
The Brazilian linguist Cleo Altenhofen considers the denomination "mother tongue" in its general usage to be imprecise and subject to various interpretations that are biased in linguistic prejudices, especially with respect to bilingual children from ethnic minority groups. He cites his own experience as a bilingual speaker of Portuguese language and Riograndenser Hunsr=FCckisch, a German-rooted language brought to Southern Brazil by the first German immigrants. In his case, like that of many children whose home language differs from the language of the environment (the 'official' language), it is debatable which language is his 'mother tongue'. Many scholars gave definitions of 'mother tongue' through the years based on common usage, the emotional relation from the speaker towards the language, and even its dominance in relation to the environment. However, all of these criteria lack precision.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First language
¿Y qué? Usas un argumento basado en la historia, la que tendrá nada que ver con el futuro.Convencete Jorton, el futuro es Español.

Dia a dia el español gana mas adeptos en todos los paises del Mundo. Menos en USA.
Yo pensaba que eran mas listos por alli.
Y como diría el Gurriato, las lenguas pertenecen a la gente, no a la tierra.Eso dijo Gurris?

Que claridad de miras, que obviedad pragmatica, que retorica flamenquina...

Servidor opina que las lenguas no son de naides. Las lenguas son el sofgüear de la mente colectiva, sin derechos de autor.
Todo eso de las lenguas propias e impropias no son sino manuelas mentales a la polaka (pajichuelas prefontales a la remanguillé).

Si los polakos quieren que la gente lea novelas en polako, que escriban buenas novelas. Si quieren que la gente vaya a ver pelis en polaco, que rueden buenas pelis; pero con eso de las multas, las cuotas y las putadas no irán a ningún lado y acabarán cayendo aun más gordos de lo que ya caen a olcraist.
GURRIATEMBERG
Dia a dia el español gana mas adeptos en todos los paises del Mundo. Menos en USA.

Bueno, ésto nunca lo pensé ver: No has mencionado inmediatamente a Catalunya y a sus iniquidades en contra del idioma castellano. Sólo unos comentarios al final, algo como 'y bueno, son giles y que se jodan'.

No los has delatado como a ejército tratando y planeando toda clase de ultrajes e injurias en contra del castellano.
Increíble.
Oa
The Brazilian linguist Cleo Altenhofen considers the denomination "mother tongue" in its general usage to be imprecise and subject to various interpretations that are biased in linguistic prejudices, especially with respect to bilingual children from ethnic minority groups.
This guy, Cleo, gets lost in so many words. A mother's tongue, is of course, the language a child learns on his mother's knees. That it may not be the mother's, her own mother's tongue is immaterial.

Oscar
A person's first language, native language or mother tongue is the language that was learned first by the person. Correspondingly, the person is called a native speaker of the language, although one may also be a native speaker of more than one language if all of the languages are learned naturally without formal instruction, such as through cultural immersion before puberty. Often a child learns the basics of his or her first languages from his or her family.

The terms first, native, and mother can be misleading. It is quite possible that the first language learned is no longer a speaker's dominant language, and therefore no longer the first language. Young immigrant children, whose families have moved to a new linguistic environment may lose, in part or in totality, the language they first acquired.
Good skills in one's native languages are essential for further learning, as a native language is thought to be a base of thinking. Incomplete first language skills often make learning other languages difficult. Native language has therefore a central role in education.

The term "mother tongue" should not be interpreted to mean that it is the language of one's mother. In some paternal societies, the wife moves in with the husband and thus may have a different first language, or dialect, than the local language of the husband. Yet their children usually only speak their local language. Only a few will learn to speak their mothers' languages like natives. Mother in this context probably originated from the definition of mother as source, or origin; as in mother-country or land.
One can have two or more native languages, thus being a native bilingual or indeed multilingual. The order in which these languages are learned is not necessarily the order of proficiency. For instance, a French-speaking couple might have a daughter who learned French first, then English; but if she grew up in the United States, she is likely to become more proficient in English.
The Brazilian linguist Cleo Altenhofen considers the denomination "mother tongue" in its general usage to be imprecise and subject to various interpretations that are biased in linguistic prejudices, especially with respect to bilingual children from ethnic minority groups. He cites his own experience as a bilingual speaker of Portuguese language and Riograndenser Hunsrückisch, a German-rooted language brought to Southern Brazil by the first German immigrants. In his case, like that of many children whose home language differs from the language of the environment (the 'official' language), it is debatable which language is his 'mother tongue'. Many scholars gave definitions of 'mother tongue' through the years based on common usage, the emotional relation from the speaker towards the language, and even its dominance in relation to the environment. However, all of these criteria lack precision.
language
"RafaMinu" (Email Removed) wrote in
Besides is the customer who is always right.

Rule #1 - The customer is always right
Rule #2 - If the customer is not right, go to Rule #1 :-D

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Begoluna
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Thanks for most of the corrections. I don't see what's wromg with "it has none or very few and far behind competitors", though...

But I do, and I'm the native speaker. The native speaker is always right. ALWAYS.

For the benefit non-AUE readers, this isn't always true. Especially when UC says it.
What do you expect from someone who has been prejudized against for his condition of a bilingual speaker of Portuguese language and Riograndenser Hunsr=FCckisch, a German-rooted language brought to Southern Brazil by the first German immigrants? Eyn?

gets lost in so many words? That sounds familiar, Gaucho...

Lo de la lengua inmaterial materna no lontendio...
This guy, Cleo, gets lost in so many words. A mother's tongue, is of course, the language a child learns on his mother's knees. That it may =not be the mother's, her own mother's tongue is immaterial.

The Brazilian linguist Cleo Altenhofen considers the denomination "mother tongue" in its general usage to be imprecise and subject to various interpretations that are biased in linguistic prejudices, especially with respect to bilingual children from ethnic minority groups.
How can one possibly have any fun in this world, without making fun of people for their customs and language? How do you think people in Spain keep smiling? It is their national sport! You do the same when you say that Spanish is better than English, Spanish is the language of the future, why don't you dumb-ass Yankees teach Spanish in your schools (when we do in fact teach it in our schools)? And then you condemn others for following your miserable example!
"Prejudize" no existe. Y si existiera, no se usaría con preposiciones.

Earle
What do you expect from someone who has been prejudized against for his condition of a bilingual speaker of Portuguese language and Riograndenser Hunsrückisch, a German-rooted language brought to Southern Brazil by the first German immigrants? Eyn?

gets lost in so many words? That sounds familiar, Gaucho...

Lo de la lengua inmaterial materna no lontendio...
This guy, Cleo, gets lost in so many words. A mother's tongue, is of course, the language a child learns on his mother's knees. That it maynot be the mother's, her own mother's tongue is immaterial.

The Brazilian linguist Cleo Altenhofen considers the denomination "mother tongue" in its general usage to be imprecise and subject to various interpretations that are biased in linguistic prejudices, especially with respect to bilingual children from ethnic minority groups.
But I do, and I'm the native speaker. The native speaker is always right. ALWAYS.

For the benefit non-AUE readers, this isn't always true. Especially when UC says it.

If it were true, all English children would pass GCSE English with full marks. Nor would there be any grammatical guides since we would all be right all the time.

John Dean
Oxford
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