Hola,

Tengo pregunta. I know that in spanish it goes noun than adjective. for example, carro rojo

How come the word 'de' is used sometimes? for example, planes de pago (i just read this in a local newspaper)

I used to think it had to do with posesssion, but now after reading that last example I'm not so sure anymore.

I would appreciate any explanation on this.

Gracias,
Bob
1 2
I'm not a grammar expert but, I don't think any of these are adjectives. Planes de pago translates as "payments plan"

I hope this helps

Bose

P.S. you should say "tengo una pregunta"
thanks for the reply. I thought of 'plan' as the noun and 'payment' as the adjective being a type of plan.
But it's possible to say:

la mujer de rojo / the woman dressed in red
SanzBut it's possible to say:

la mujer de rojo / the woman dressed in red
Could I say carro de rojo?

if not, why?
If something is an adjective, then it doesn't need "de." Right?
If something can be an adjective, then it can be put after the subject. Right?

How about this:

1. Yo escribo un entra diario.
2. Yo escribo un entra de diario.

Translation: I am writing a journal entry.

Is number two correct?
Is number one correct?
Why or why not?
SanzBut it's possible to say:

la mujer de rojo / the woman dressed in red
I believe the literal translation would be this: The women of red.
To me, that's like saying this: The giant of green.

I think of those like this:
1. The red woman.
2. The green giant.

Wouldn't it be better to say, "La mujer en rojo"?

It seems as though the participant interpreting that language will fill in the gap: Green what? Green clothes? Green skin? Green ___?
I've seen women in red latex paint.

That's why the previous thing by Sanz might seem appropriate. However, I feel that it's incorrect. I'm not going going to argue with a native speaker, but I believe the person would be in clothes, not of clothes. The woman's body is in a physical item. Her body is not of, or composed of, a physical item.

I think a lot of these things have to do with the philosophy of language and the idea of personhood.

Wouldn't these be more specific?

1. La mujer en la ropas rojo.
2. La mujer en las vendajes rojo.
Ghost WriterIf something is an adjective, then it doesn't need "de." Right?
If something can be an adjective, then it can be put after the subject. Right?

Ese es el punto:
sustantivo + adjetivo: la casa blanca, la fruta podrida, la piedra filosofal
sustantivo + de + adjetivo: libreta de direcciones, podadora de césped, pelota de fútbol

Creo que encontrar en el español un ejemplo con sustantivo + sustantivo es muy raro.

Con respecto a la mujer en rojo, simplemente la preposición de cumple esa función en este contexto, no tiene que ser un asunto lógico.
¿Por que no tiene que ser un asunto lógico?

Does "la mujer en rojo" mean the same as "la mujer de rojo"?
Bob
SanzBut it's possible to say:

la mujer de rojo / the woman dressed in red
Could I say carro de rojo?

if not, why?
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