+0
Hola amigos del foro:
Las reglas básicas no son tan complicadas, son
bastante buenas para aprender, pero ¡las excepciones!,
y todavía también la diferencia entre la forma de "usted" y "tú",
me pongo loco totalmente:
Poner Ponga Pon
Tener Tenga Ten
Decir Diga Di
Salir Salga Sal
Venir Venga Ven
y...
Ver Vea Ve
Hacer Haga Haz
y entonces....
Dar Dé Da
Estar Esté Está
Ir Vaya Ve
Ser Sea Sé

Creo que mejoramente voy a estudiar el Chino.

Mi pregunta a vosotros ¿cuál forma se utilizan más los españoles?
Me parece sencillo para usar sólo úna forma, entonces prefería la de "usted".
¿Qué pensáis?
De nuevo muchas gracias.
+0
wikkeMi pregunta a vosotros ¿cuál forma se utilizan más los españoles?
Depende de la situación, de cómo sea la frase, de con quién estés hablando, etc.

En cuanto a los fallos:
wikkeLas reglas básicas no son tan complicadas, son bastante buenas para aprender, pero ¡las excepciones!, y todavía también la diferencia entre la forma de "usted" y "tú", me pongo loco totalmente:
Yo diría:

Las reglas básicas no son tan complicadas, son bastante buenas para aprender, pero las excepciones no. Y encima me vuelvo loco a la hora de diferenciar el "usted" y el "tú".

Usted = Formal

Tú = Informal
Comments  
Hola:

The imperative is just one more tense, but with an advantage, because it has only two forms that are of its own, (2nd person singular, 2nd person plural), moreover 2nd person plural is only used in Spain and most of the time it is replaced with the infinitive. So you only have to learn the 2nd person singular. It doesn't seem too much. Of course, irregular verbs usually have irregular imperatives.

All the other (than 2nd) persons borrow the imperative form from the present subjunctive ( oh yes, this one you have to learn, I'm affraid).

You should learn the 2nd person imperative, it is extremely frequent.

But things are not that bad, the negative imperative is much, much more frequent, and in the negative al the forms are borrowed from the present subjunctive.

I assume that by now you already know the present subjunctive forms, but if you don't, forget for the time being the imperative and plunge into the subjunctive, it is much more useful.
Dear TitoIndigo,

I am afraid that I have to follow up your advice and
"plunge into the subjunctive": I looked it up in my lessons
and its just comming up at the end of my present textbooEmotion: sweatingk!!!!:
I seem to be not far enough, so I only have to wait calmly end
learn my lessons step by step..........
I hope it will ever work?!Emotion: shake
Thank you my friend. Wikke.
...did you check my spanish text for mistakes? its all ok?.......
 Pucca's reply was promoted to an answer.
Hola, Wikke:

Sobre el uso de Ud. vs. :
Para no se confunden el uno con el otro,
sería mejor pensar en ésto:
1. Usted = "You, sir." (e.g.: Sr. Presidente, es un honor para mi servirle a Usted. =
It's an honor to be of service to you, sir, Mr. President.)

2. Tú = "You" (e.g.: eres mi mejor amigo.)

Ojo: *Use Usted when you are tralking to someone older or with rank,

or to an unfamiliar person even of your same age.
*Use for people you know, of your same age, or younger.

I hope these serve.