America becomes global marketplace
By Jeffrey Sparshott \ THE WASHINGTON TIMES
Part two of five
Coke, Big Macs and IPods.
The United States creates some of the world's most innovative products, dominating brands and profitable business models, exporting them around the globe with tremendous success.
Of the world's 100 most valuable brands, 62 are American, according to Interbrand, a consulting group that annually evaluates products. It's a fair accomplishment for a country that produces less than one-third of the world's economic output.
"It's testimony to the superior marketing and business acumen of American companies. We punch 200 percent of our business weight," says John Quelch, a Harvard Business School professor who has studied and written about global brands.
The successes of companies such as Coca-Cola, McDonald's and Apple create wealth and jobs in the United States and overseas. But American brands also generate resentment, copycats and fierce competition. Business and commerce is one arena where the world is increasingly "American." This series examines nonmilitary, nonpolitical aspects of this pervasive U.S. influence - from democratic ideals and entrepreneurial ingenuity to language, sports and popular culture - and some of the consequences of this influence.
The United States is the world's leading exporter and importer, and its companies spend more money establishing and expanding overseas operations than those of any other nation.
In 2003, U.S. exports of merchandise and commercial services totaled $1.01 trillion, according to the World Trade Organization (WTO). Top exports include $46.1 billion in semiconductors, $31.3 billion in computer accessories, $36.2 billion in vehicle parts, $22.1 billion in cars, $23.3 billion in civilian aircraft and $20.5 billion in pharmaceuticals, according to 2003 Commerce Department statistics.
The United States plays another important role as the world's largest market, with free-spending consumers looking for good deals on quality products.
U.S. imports of merchandise in 2003 more than doubled those of the second-leading country. Consumers and companies bought $1.3 trillion in goods and an additional $229 billion in services, the WTO says. "The U.S. is the locomotive for global growth. If we were not providing that stimulus, it seems quite possible that the rest of the world economy would slip back into recession," says Kent Hughes, director of the America and the Global Economy Project at the Woodrow Wilson Center.

More than a market
American consumers are not just a market; they are an entire business model for some companies.
"It's 100 percent (that) we sell in the United States," says Ziad Salah, commercial and finance manager for United Garment Manufacturing Co. The Amman, Jordan, company makes pants, jackets and other clothes and sells them to retailers such as Wal-Mart and Target.
The enterprise employs 750 workers. Each of the 300,000 garments made every month goes to the United States.
"If the U.S. market is open, it will create more opportunity and employ a lot of people - it will reduce unemployment in Jordan," Mr. Salah says. But America's role as the world's most voracious consumer may not be sustainable.
The U.S. current account deficit, the broadest measure of trade, hit $164.7 billion in the third quarter of 2004. The figure represents 6 percent of U.S. economic output and is a record. The deficit is financed by borrowing from abroad and foreign investment in the United States. Continuing deficits has made the United States the world's leading debtor. Other nations held almost $2.7 trillion in government and private U.S. securities, stocks, bonds, cash and other assets at the end of 2003, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis. That position is expected to worsen.
"A quarter of a century ago, the United States was still the largest net lender on earth; 20 years ago, its global assets still exceeded its liabilities. Today, however, its net investment position is sinking below negative $3 trillion," Peter G. Peterson, chairman of the Council on Foreign Relations and a Nixon administration commerce secretary, writes in the September-October issue of Foreign Affairs. "Americans may hope that the rest of the world will go on lending unlimited funds forever. That wish, however, is unrealistic."
Mr. Peterson says the United States must export more and save more while the rest of the world must import more and consume more, an adjustment that requires substantial shifts of labor, capital and culture. "Although no one can predict how the current imbalance in the global economy will play out, trade economists marvel at just how many ways this lopsided flywheel can spin off the axle," Mr. Peterson says.

Investing abroad
Even as the rest of the world finances American consumption, U.S. companies invest more than their counterparts from other nations in new operations abroad.
U.S. foreign direct investment was $1.3 trillion from 1994 through 2003, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Britain was next, with $878 billion.
The OECD argument, which has its critics, is that foreign investment brings higher wages and introduces new technologies and managerial skills to developing countries. The investments contribute to rising prosperity and create demand for exports from wealthy economies, it says. Until 2003, the United States also was the world's leading recipient of foreign investment. But dollar figures are dropping, from $321 billion during 2000 to $39.9 billion last year.
China and Hong Kong together received $66 billion, the OECD said, knocking the United States off its perch as the world's top destination for foreign investment.
Aspiring countries hope to surpass the United States in other areas as well. And many believe that the United States - because of its trade deficit, budget deficit and an unpopular war in Iraq - is particularly susceptible to competition.
"Most astute people around the world realize that America is very vulnerable. Its economy is held together by the ability to attract investment and capital. The whole of the American system, which has been a glowing success story, it could come to an end very quickly," says Kalle Lasn, editor in chief of Adbusters, a counterculture magazine that encouraged boycotts against American brands after the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq.
"It is time for the backlash, time for the American economy to get its comeuppance," says Mr. Lasn, a native Estonian who now lives in Canada.

Competing images
The Financial Times in October reported that Coca-Cola, McDonald's, Marlboro, General Motors, Disney, Wal-Mart and the Gap all were struggling in "old Europe."
The London newspaper ascribed declining or stagnating sales to anti-American sentiment, and some observers agree. "Many in the world have been upset for quite some time over what they perceive as an invasion of American culture and values and bad corporate behavior. And the trend is not limited to Western Europe and the Middle East," Mike Eskew, chairman and chief executive of UPS, writes in the October edition of Globalist, an online magazine.
Any downturn in overseas sales would hurt the bottom line of America's strongest brands. McDonald's, for example, earned $1.85 billion in Europe and Asia through the nine months ending Sept. 30. U.S. earnings totaled $1.75 billion during the same time.
Apple's net sales for fiscal 2004, which ended Sept. 25, hit $4 billion in the Americas, almost $1.8 billion in Europe and $677 million in Japan. The company's sales growth was led by the IPod, designed in California but assembled in China.
Coke's North American net operating revenues were almost $5.1 billion for the three quarters ending Sept. 30, while Asia's were $3.6 billion; Europe, Eurasia and the Middle East were $5.5 billion; Latin America was $1.5 billion; and Africa was $736 million.
Harvard's Mr. Quelch, however, says there is no longer a strong link between perceptions of American politics and consumer behavior. A survey of consumers worldwide, published in September's Harvard Business Review, indicates that the consumers bought or refused products because of the global image of the individual product, not its identification with America. "What we didn't find was anti-American sentiment that colored judgments about U.S.-based global brands," Mr. Quelch says in the article. Keep making good products that people want, and they will sell.

Emulating America
Still, the United States competes fiercely with counterparts around the world. In an increasingly global world, that competition often places workers on the front lines.
Sandra Polaski, senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, says the Cold War's end - and the ascendance of market-driven economies - brought hundreds of millions of workers into the global economy. Technological changes allow them to compete directly with each other.
"The scale of the labor supply shock is unlike anything experienced before. These changes have brought the two largest countries in the world, China and India, fully into the global production system, along with hundreds of millions of workers in other formerly socialist countries," Ms. Polaski writes in an article published this year.
The oversupply depresses wages. It also means that countries like India and China can produce goods more cheaply than the United States. But developing countries are no longer solely interested in operating as cheap-labor manufacturing platforms. China, Brazil, India and other increasingly assertive nations often try to emulate American success in educating their work forces, attracting talent and developing new products. "I would still put a lot of emphasis on the importance of ideas. The United States is not just a productive leader, but an innovative leader. The (middle-income) countries are trying to replicate American success," says the Wilson Center's Mr. Hughes.
Developed and developing nations have created rivals to U.S. industries that, at one time, seemed unassailable.
Airplane manufacturer Airbus, a European consortium based in France, in
2001 overtook Chicago-based Boeing as the world's top seller of commercialaircraft.
China-based Lenovo this year bought the personal-computer operations of IBM.
Japan's Toyota Motor Corp. overtook Ford Motor as the number two automaker, by vehicle sales, in 2003. And Toyota's $10.2 billion in earnings for its fiscal year ending in March is more than General Motors, Ford and DaimlerChrysler combined.
Challenges of innovation
"America's economic and political standing are fundamentally bound up in our capacity as a society to innovate, and we now face much more serious competitive challenges from new centers of innovation across an increasingly interconnected planet," the December report of the Council on Competitiveness says.
Six of the world's 25 most competitive information-technology companies are based in the United States, according to the council, a nonprofit group of companies such as IBM and General Motors and universities such as Stanford and Columbia.
Foreign-owned companies and foreign-born inventors account for nearly half of all U.S. patents, the council's report says. "We believe that the bar for innovation is rising. And simply running in place will not be enough to sustain America's leadership in the 21st century," the report concludes. "Innovation itself - where it comes from and how it creates value - is changing."
Part I:
America enjoys view from the top
Reprints and Permissions
Copyright 2004 News World Communications, Inc.
All site contents copyright © 2004 News World Communications, Inc. Privacy Policy
1 2 3 4 5 6
America becomes global marketplace By Jeffrey Sparshott \ THE WASHINGTON TIMES Part two of five Coke, Big Macs and ... like 'Star Wars' deserves to rule the world." - Philip Adams, former chairman of the Australian Film Commission (snip)

Estas son las primeras lineas de los cuatro ultimos articulos posteados por don Ricardo Gonzales. Me parece interesante contraponerlos, porque muestra un elemento revelador del clima USAno actual: la necesidad de proclamar urbi et orbi que los USAnos son los mas exitosos, los mas cultivados, los mas geniales, los mas envidiados por todos los pueblos de la tierra, para decirlo en una frase a la Petry, que "USA is #1" y que, naturalmente, "deserves to rule the world".
Cualquiera que lea un diario europeo encontrara basicamente un lenguaje critico del pais donde el diario se publica. Los diarios franceses critican (en mi opinion excesivamente) al sistema administrativo frances, a las empresas francesas, a la sociedad francesa, y los diarios britanicos tienden a hacer lo mismo. Si se les cree, todo va mal: sus empresas son rigidas, sus sociedades inmobilistas y racistas, sus economias se contraen, sus sistemas de ensenianza van mal... Cualquiera que lea un diario USAno por el contrario encontrara que se puede criticar a hombres, pero raramente al sistema.Esta expresion, como cualquiera que tenga un minimo de conocimiento en psicologia sabe, es un signo de inseguridad. La gente que esta intimamente convencida de ser "#1" no siente la necesidad de repetirlo cotidianamente. Solo la gente que se siente inadaptada, que querria ser "#1" y siente que no lo es, necesita repetirse a si misma cotidianamente que todo va bien, a ver si termina convenciendose. Esta inseguridad no es nueva: recuerdo haber asistido a un espectaculo de canciones folkloricas en Tenessee hace ya mas de diez anios, en el cual el cantante decia "este es el pais que tiene el rio mas largo del mundo" antes de cantar una cancion sobre el Mississipi, "este es el pais que tiene las praderas mas grandes del mundo" antes de cantarte la conquista del oeste...

llendo hasta el ridiculo de afirmar "este es el pais que tuvo la mas grande guerra civil del mundo" antes de cantar una cancion de la Guerra de secesion...
El complejo "mais grande do mondo" existe en todos los paises "nuevos", que necesitan construirse una identidad (de ahi el orgullo de tener la avenida mas ancha del mundo y la calle mas larga del mundo, en un pais que prefiero no nombrar...). Pero uno pensaria que en un pais que se ha vuelto una potencia militar, industrial y politica de esa dimension el complejo seria menos fuerte. No es asi: los USAnos siguen necesitando convencerse que son lo mejor que existe.
Saludos
mario "el franchute"
America becomes global marketplace By Jeffrey Sparshott \ THE WASHINGTON TIMES Part two of five Coke, Big Macs and ... like 'Star Wars' deserves to rule the world." - Philip Adams, former chairman of the Australian Film Commission (snip)

Estas son las primeras lineas de los cuatro ultimos articulos posteados por don Ricardo Gonzales. Me parece interesante contraponerlos, porque muestra un elemento revelador del clima USAno actual: la necesidad de proclamar urbi et orbi que los USAnos son los mas exitosos, los mas cultivados, los mas geniales, los mas envidiados por todos los pueblos de la tierra, para decirlo en una frase a la Petry, que "USA is #1" y que, naturalmente, "deserves to rule the world".
Cualquiera que lea un diario europeo encontrara basicamente un lenguaje critico del pais donde el diario se publica. Los diarios franceses critican (en mi opinion excesivamente) al sistema administrativo frances, a las empresas francesas, a la sociedad francesa, y los diarios britanicos tienden a hacer lo mismo. Si se les cree, todo va mal: sus empresas son rigidas, sus sociedades inmobilistas y racistas, sus economias se contraen, sus sistemas de ensenianza van mal... Cualquiera que lea un diario USAno por el contrario encontrara que se puede criticar a hombres, pero raramente al sistema.Esta expresion, como cualquiera que tenga un minimo de conocimiento en psicologia sabe, es un signo de inseguridad. La gente que esta intimamente convencida de ser "#1" no siente la necesidad de repetirlo cotidianamente. Solo la gente que se siente inadaptada, que querria ser "#1" y siente que no lo es, necesita repetirse a si misma cotidianamente que todo va bien, a ver si termina convenciendose. Esta inseguridad no es nueva: recuerdo haber asistido a un espectaculo de canciones folkloricas en Tenessee hace ya mas de diez anios, en el cual el cantante decia "este es el pais que tiene el rio mas largo del mundo" antes de cantar una cancion sobre el Mississipi, "este es el pais que tiene las praderas mas grandes del mundo" antes de cantarte la conquista del oeste...

llendo hasta el ridiculo de afirmar "este es el pais que tuvo la mas grande guerra civil del mundo" antes de cantar una cancion de la Guerra de secesion...
El complejo "mais grande do mondo" existe en todos los paises "nuevos", que necesitan construirse una identidad (de ahi el orgullo de tener la avenida mas ancha del mundo y la calle mas larga del mundo, en un pais que prefiero no nombrar...). Pero uno pensaria que en un pais que se ha vuelto una potencia militar, industrial y politica de esa dimension el complejo seria menos fuerte. No es asi: los USAnos siguen necesitando convencerse que son lo mejor que existe. Y lo que es peor: los USAnos por adopcion consideran que hay que gritarlo mas fuerte que los otros para marcar su integracion.
Saludos
mario "el franchute"
Cualquiera que lea un diario europeo encontrara basicamente un lenguaje critico del pais donde el diario se publica. Los diarios ... Cualquiera que lea un diario USAno por el contrario encontrara que se puede criticar a hombres, pero raramente al sistema.

Parcialmente de acuerdo. Yo seguí de cerca al WSJ y al Boston Globe de 2000 a 2003 (aunque no los tabloides de Murdoch) y percibí que algunos principios son sacrosantos, pero no todos. Se critican bastante a las instituciones y se exacerban conflictos insignificantes, a veces a un nivel ridículo.
El complejo "mais grande do mondo" existe en todos los paises "nuevos", que necesitan construirse una identidad (de ahi el orgullo de tener la avenida mas ancha del mundo y la calle mas larga del mundo, en un pais que prefiero no nombrar...).

No es un parámetro serio para analizar las cosas.
Hace apenas unas semanas Chirac inauguró "el puente más alto del mundo" y hace unos días mostraron al "avión de pasajeros más grande del mundo" en Toulouse. Hace eso que los franceses constituyan una "sociedad insegura"? No. Son sólo elementos adicionales de identificación.
Pero uno pensaria que en un pais que se ha
vuelto una potencia militar, industrial y politica de esa dimension el complejo seria menos fuerte. No es asi: los USAnos siguen necesitando convencerse que son lo mejor que existe.

El tema es complejo. Creo que hay otros aspectos sumergidos detrás de esa necesidad.
Saludos mario "el franchute"

Saludos,
Andrés
El complejo "mais grande do mondo" existe en todos los ... larga del mundo, en un pais que prefiero no nombrar...).

No es un parámetro serio para analizar las cosas. Hace apenas unas semanas Chirac inauguró "el puente más alto del ... del mundo" en Toulouse. Hace eso que los franceses constituyan una "sociedad insegura"? No. Son sólo elementos adicionales de identificación.

Tus ejemplos no cuajan. Es normal que en el momento en que se inaugura el puente mas alto del mundo, se mencione que es el mas alto del mundo. Dudo mucho que veas a politicos y periodistas franceses dentro de cinco años sugiriendo que Francia tiene un destino manifiesto y es una sociedad unica y superior a todas las demas porque tiene el puente mas alto del mundo.

PINKO
No es un parámetro serio para analizar las cosas. Hace ... constituyan una "sociedadinsegura"? No. Son sólo elementos adicionales de identificación.

Tus ejemplos no cuajan. Es normal que *en el momento en que se *** puente mas alto del mundo, se ... destino manifiesto y es una sociedad unicay superior a todas las demas porque tiene el puente mas alto del mundo.

Tampoco los argentinos creen que tienen un "destino manifiesto" porque tengan "la avenida más ancha del mundo", si vamos al caso.

No creo que el tema sea tan simple. Franceses y británicos mantuvieron la línea del Concorde por décadas pese a que no era un medio muy económico ni rentable, y sólo decidieron su defunción luego del accidente generado por el tren de aterrizaje. No conozco franceses que vivan alardeando de sus logros ingenieriles, pero cierto prestigio les otorgaba el hecho de haber construido el único avión supersónico de uso comercial continuo.
PINKO

Andrés
America becomes global marketplace By Jeffrey Sparshott \ THE ... Adams, former chairman of the Australian Film Commission (snip)

Estas son las primeras lineas de los cuatro ultimos articulos posteados por don Ricardo Gonzales. Me parece interesante contraponerlos, porque ... por adopcion consideran que hay que gritarlo mas fuerte que los otros para marcar su integracion. Saludos mario "el franchute"

El comentario de mario sería acertado, si ricardo gonzalez cortara y pegara artículos de varios diarios de USA. Nótese, sin embargo, que ricardo tiene mucho cuidado de no traer artículos escritos en el Washington Post, el New York Times, el Boston Globe, Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, o USA Today.
Las cosas que a ricardo le interesan estan sacadas del Wall Street Journal, o escritas por colaboradores de la Fox News (una cadena de televisión que tiene como público gente que encuentra a CNN demasiado liberal e izquierdista), del Washington Times (el diario del reverendo Moon, un delincuente convicto), o artículos del website de town Hall, un basurero de extrema derecha en internet.
Lo que ricardo gonzalez corta y pega no es representativo de la prensa se USA. Es como si la gente se hiciera idea de lo que es la prensa argentina por los posteos de chuck y martori, cortando y pegando cosas que encontran en la Nueva Provincia, Ambitoweb, o la Fundación Atlas.

Saludos,
VV
No es un parámetro serio para analizar las cosas. Hace ... una "sociedad insegura"? No. Son sólo elementos adicionales de identificación.

Tus ejemplos no cuajan. Es normal que en el momento en que se inaugura el puente mas alto del mundo, ... manifiesto y es una sociedad unica y superior a todas las demas porque tiene el puente mas alto del mundo.
Ademas, notaras que hay una diferencia entre tener "el puente mas grande del mundo" o "el avion mas grande del mundo", que son cosas que se CONSTRUYEN MEDIANTE INVENTIVIDAD Y ESFUERZO, con el cacareo sobre "la calle mas larga del mundo", "la avenida mas ancha del mundo" o "el rio mas largo del mundo", cosas que dependen o bien de una coincidencia, o bien de un simple "etat de fait" que no requiere ni esfuerzo, ni invencion, ni nada.

Y ni hablemos de la "guerra civil mas grande del mundo", que mas bien que genialidad muestra una descomunal estupidez. Una cosa es creer que uno es un genio porque puede construir "el puente mas grande del mundo", y otra muy diferente es cree que uno es un genio porque dio la casualidad que nacio al lado del rio mas grande del mundo, no le parece ?
Saludos
Mario "el franchute"
Tus ejemplos no cuajan. Es normal que *en el momento ... las demas porque tiene el puente mas alto del mundo.

Ademas, notaras que hay una diferencia entre tener "el puente mas grande del mundo" o "el avion mas grande del ... de una coincidencia, o bien de un simple "etat de fait" que no requiere ni esfuerzo, ni invencion, ni nada.

Hay algo mas profundo en el "triunfalismo" americano, que yo nunca llegue a entender completamente. Me parece que en practicamente cualquier otro pais, si se hubiesen metido en el pantano de Iraq, habria custionamientos serios. En EEUU, el presidente anuncia que lo que esta sucediendo alli es realmente un gran triunfo, y la gente no solo no se le rie en la cara, sino que medio como que se lo cree. Asi como el desastre de Vietnam fue transformado en la ultima eleccion en un gran triunfo patriotico. Lo atacaban a Kerry no por haber participado en la guerra de Vietnam, sino por haberla criticado.

Casi la inversa de lo que se ha señalado algunas veces sobre los argentinos, que se quejan constantemente aun cuando las cosas van bien.

Lo que puede ser que este sucediendo en los ultimos años es que ese triunfalismo americano esta siendo utilizado cada vez mas cinicamente para simplemente ignorar los problemas. Cada cosa que no funciona, sea Iraq, la falta de creacion de empleos, el monumental deficit fiscal, el aumento de la pobreza, etc etc, es rebautizado como un gran triunfo.

Me da la impresion, quiza superficial, que EEUU se alaba demasiado a si mismos, y que a la inversa, los europeos tienden a ser demasiado modestos. En este momento, el experimento impresionante en su audacia para construir un mundo nuevo se esta llevando a cabo en Europa, no en EEUU. Son los europeos los que han analizado como se puede lograr que distintas culturas puedan convivir sobre una base compartida de valores comunes, y estan aplicando en terminos concretos los resultados. Que un pais como Rumania se haya transformado al extremo de que puede ser parte de la UE, ni que hablar de la posibilidad de incorporar a Turquia, es algo impresionante.

Sin embargo, la retorica (al menos en EEUU) es que en Europa no pasa nada, que las "grandes visiones globales" solo surgen de EEUU. Aun cuando no hay ninguna prueba concreta en los ultimos años de que sea asi. Si no se ha conseguido ni una integracion aceptable con Mexico, o una transformacion real de un paisito como Afganistan, no veo como pueden andar creyendose que van a transformar el Oriente Medio. Pero lo creen.

Mientras tanto, China sigue alegremente pescando en rio revuelto. Tiempos interesantes, estos.
PINKO
Mostrar más