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Donde esta...

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Gringo:
Are both of these correct and/or common?
1. Dondo esta Jose
2. Donde es Jose

#2 seems to have a more direct translation to english "Where is Jose". I have a hard time with the first, but it may be more correct.

What about: Donde es la tienda vs. Donde estas tienda?

Gracias,
Gringo
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ClassicFedora:
Gringo, when you're talking about the location of something, the correct verb is always "estar". For example...
1. ¿Donde está México?.....México está al sur de Los Estados Unidos.
2.¿Donde están los ladrones?... Los ladrones están en la cárcel.
3. ¿Donde está Pedro?.... Pedro está con mi hermana.
4. ¿Donde está tu casa?.... Tu casa está en la calle Main.

Ok, so that's simple enough. Now, if you're talking about the occurrence of something - for example, a party - then the correct verb is "ser". Example:
1. La fiesta será en la casa de Pedro. (The party will be at Pedro's house.)

I hope this helps you out a bit.
Classic Fedora

Are both of these correct and/or common?
1. Dondo esta Jose
2. Donde es Jose

#2 seems to have a more direct translation to english "Where is Jose". I have a hard time with the first, but it may be more correct.

What about: Donde es la tienda vs. Donde estas tienda?

Gracias,
Gringo
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Anonymous:
[nq:1]Gringo, when you're talking about the location of something, the correct verb is always "estar". For example... 1. ¿Donde está ... casa de Pedro. (The party will be at Pedro's house.) I hope this helps you out a bit. Classic Fedora[/nq]
Again adding to CF's very good post in answer to Gringo:
ser denotes permanence
estar denotes impermanence and location.
Estas mal? =are you sick? vs. Es usted mal? = Are you a bad person?

Ella esta muy linda. =She is lovely (right now) or is more lovely at this moment than usual.
Ella es linda. She's a beautiful girl (all the time).

Estoy estdiando. I'm studying. (right now)
Soy estudiante. I'm a student.
Again I'm in no way trying to correct CF and in some strictly by the rules way I may even be somewhat grammatically incorrect nor are necessarily how real people would say these things. What I'm doing is offering ways of looking at these words that helped me to understand them when I was first starting out.
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Gringo:
ClassicFedora,
In #4, you write: Tu casa esta en la calle Main. Since you are using "Tu", why don't you use "estas" as in: Tu casa estas en la calle Main.

Also, you provided the answer to the question "Where is the party", but how would you write the question? Would it be "Donde esta la fiesta" even though you use "ser" to answer? In other words, how do you ask where the occurance of something is?
Thanks
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neoholistic:
x-no-archive: yes
[nq:1]ClassicFedora, In #4, you write: Tu casa esta en la calle Main. Since you are using "Tu", why don't you use "estas" as in: Tu casa estas en la calle Main.[/nq]
"Tu"

"your" (possesive adjective)
"Tú"

"you" (personal pronoun)
"Tu casa" ("your house") is the subject so the verb must be conjugated in the third person.
[nq:1]Also, you provided the answer to the question "Where is the party", but how would you write the question? Would ... even though you use "ser" to answer? In other words, how do you ask where the occurance of something is?[/nq]
"La fiesta será en..." is short for "la fiesta será celebrada en..." ("the party will be (held) at...") hence the using of the verb "ser".

"¿Dónde es la fiesta?" =

"where is the party (held)?" "¿Dónde está tu coche?"

= "where is your car?" (asking for the temporary
location of an object or person).
[nq:2]What about: Donde es la tienda vs. Donde estas tienda?[/nq]
This is totally wrong: you're not asking the shop! You're asking your interlocutor about the location of a third object, person or place - so you must use the third person (just like in English).

"¿Dónde está la tienda?"

"where is the shop?"
"¿Dónde estás, tienda?"

"where are you, shop?" (!)

Sometimes the verb "ser" is used instead of "estar" - probably because most places don't change physical location too often, and so it becomes a permanent or semi-permanent quality.
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ClassicFedora:
Gringo, I hope Neo's answer cleared things up for you.

Just to elaborate, as Neo already mentioned, the words "tu" and "tú" are two, distinct separate words. This only matters when it's written, though. Spoken, there's no difference whatsoever between the sounds of the two words.
Notice the accent mark on "Tú". This is the word for "You". You use it if you're speaking to a friend, or a child, or God.
The word "Tu" (without the accent) is "Your". As in: "Your house is on Main St.", it translates "Tu (your) casa está en la calle Main". Here, "estar" transforms into "está", because we're trying to say "house is". If you want to say "You are on Main St.", then it would be correct to say, "Tú estás en la calle Main."
Again, these are all things that Neo has already answered perfectly well. I'm just trying to explain them in terms that I think I personally would've understood more easily way back when I started learning the language.

Occurrences of things, like parties, conferences, meetings, etc. use the verb "Ser" for the reason Neo has mentioned. Maybe you could study these two sentences:
A) ¿Donde es la fiesta?.... La fiesta es en la casa de Juan. (Make your brain automatically insert the words "taking place", or "being held", or whatever works for you. Example: "¿Donde es la fiesta?... Where is the party (taking place)?" "La fiesta es en la casa de Juan... The party is (taking place) in John's house.)
B) ¿Donde están los globos?... Los globos están en la casa de Juan, porque hay una fiesta... Where are the balloons? The balloons are in John's house, because there is a party. (If you tried mentally inserting "taking place" in this sentence, it wouldn't work, would it? Example: "¿Donde están los globos? Where are the balloons (taking place)?" You can see that by mentally inserting the precise English equivalent, it helps us avoid errors until we've acquired a nice feel for the language.

*Side note: The word "hay" in Spanish means, "There is" or "There are". You can also use it in question form. "Is there? Are there?" Examples: A) ¿Hay avión en el cielo? ...Is there an airplane in the sky? B) Hay tres perros ladrando afuera ...There are three dogs barking outside.
I'm evil for presenting this word to you now, because for English speakers, it's often hard to distinguish between when to use "hay" and when to use "estar" and "ser". But I figured I would give you a head's up, so you can get it out of the way.
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Gringo:
Thanks Neo and ClassicFedora for the responses. I was aware that the accent changed the meaning of words, but I didn't know how to get it on my keyboard. But, it is becomming more apparent that I need som books to accompany the CD's that I listen to in the car. As I mentioned before, I don't have time for school, so the CD's have been my main only resource for instruction. For the most part, I understand what the two of you are trying to explain. However, when people start using words like "reflexive" and other English grammar terms to explain spanish, it makes my spanish studies even more difficult. I barely learned that stuff when I was learning english (I learned the language of mathmatics very well, though).
ClassicFedora: I would love to hear more about your methods for learning. Did you attend school, did you have books, how often and how long did you study on a daily basis, etc... How long have you been studying. How old were you? How in the heck are you supposed to practice if you don't have any spansih speakers to talk speak with? Things like that would not only satisfy my curiousity, but they also may keep me going. The more I progress and learn about what I have to learn , the more discouraged I get. At the moment, my progress is pretty much at a stand still. Let me know if you'd like to respond privately to keep the personal discussions off the newsgroup.
Thanks
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ClassicFedora:
>
I started when I was 22. I wasn't in college, and I lived in a small town in Ohio where there were no Spanish-speaking people. Once I made up my mind that I was going to learn Spanish, I went to a Barnes & Nobles bookstore in Columbus, Ohio and spent about $25 for a Spanish grammar book, and an English-Spanish dictionary. I didn't want to learn the language halfway, so I studied rigorously.My thought was that the best way to learn a language is to live in a country where it's spoken. What happens then is that you are surrounded by the language at every turn. However, I wasn't in a position to move to a Spanish-speaking country, so I decided to mimic it. I made sure to get rid of all my English language novels, if I wanted to read, I made sure it was in Spanish. I tried not to watch TV or movies unless they were in Spanish. (The introduction of DVDs helped a lot.) I stopped listening to English-language music and replaced it all with Spanish-language music.

Most importantly, I started buying index cards. You can fit about 30 English words on one side, and 30 of the Spanish equivalent on the other side. Starting out, I tried to learn about a hundred words a day. A lot of them don't completely stick in your memory, but at least it familiarizes you with them.
Finally, I knew there was a growing Hispanic population in Columbus, Ohio, so I eventually moved there and made friends within the Latino community. At that point, I spent most of my time with native Spanish speakers, and I listened closely to them, and took all the constructive criticisms I could. I always kept a pen and paper handy to jot down new stuff that I heard or learned.
>
I've been studying now for about 7 years, and still have a lot to learn. I started studying primarily Mexican Spanish, and then branched out to others, like Cuban, Puertorican, Dominican, etc. It helps that I have una buena mezcla de amigos from different countries.
I would love to talk more, but I have to go for now. It may encourage you to know that I'm a Spanish Medical Interpreter now, working in the hospitals interpreting between doctors and patients. If you really want to nail this language, you can. But you have to make up your mind 100 percent that you can do it. Your own enthusiasm is your fuel, and it can pay off in a big way.
More later, I have to go take care of some things for now...

CF
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