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"chingaso" means what in English?

Esto es una discusión · 5 respuestas
Lee Carkenord:
A Denver Colorado newspaper article says this:

" 'Chingaso' is Spanish street slang for "fight".

I don't speak Spanish very much, but having grown up on the south Texas/Mexican border, I think I disagree.

It seems to me that 'un chingaso', used as a noun, has a meaning more like a punch, or a strike, done in anger.

I agree that 'chingaso' is slang..probably from the verb 'chingar'?

I might be out of date, tho.

Maybe 'chingaso' means something slightly different, today, in Denver than it did on the Texas/Mexican border, back in the 50's and 60's.

Comments? Maybe bring me up to date?

Thanks folks.. Lee Carkenord
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Jerry Friedman:
[nq:1]A Denver Colorado newspaper article says this: " 'Chingaso' is Spanish street slang for "fight".[/nq]
If that's a brand of clothes, it'll go over big in my town. The misspelling won't matter.
[nq:1]I don't speak Spanish very much, but having grown up on the south Texas/Mexican border, I think I disagree. It ... than it did on the Texas/Mexican border, back in the 50's and 60's. Comments? Maybe bring me up to date?[/nq]
The only meaning I've heard in northern New Mexico is the one you mention--a punch, a blow. In the plural, it could mean a fight, I guess. "He wanted chingazos" = "He wanted to fight."

-- Jerry Friedman
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Greybeard:
[nq:2]A Denver Colorado newspaper article says this: " 'Chingaso' is Spanish street slang for "fight".[/nq]
[nq:1]If that's a brand of clothes, it'll go over big in my town. The misspelling won't matter.[/nq]
[nq:2]I don't speak Spanish very much, but having grown up ... 50's and 60's. Comments? Maybe bring me up to date?[/nq]
[nq:1]The only meaning I've heard in northern New Mexico is the one you mention--a punch, a blow. In the plural, it could mean a fight, I guess. "He wanted chingazos" = "He wanted to fight."[/nq]
I would guess that, more generally, "chingazo" would be a big success or a big failure.

Regards, Greybeard -- John Estill, Millersburg, Ohio, USA Inglés nativo, español maomeno mexicano "Uno tiene derecho a escoger a sus amigos, ¿no?" -- Jaime 'Lucius Plotius' Sabater
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Tempo:
Un "chingazo" es un golpe fuerte. Darle a alguien de chingazos, es darle de goles fuertes.

Cómo ya has de saber, Grey; la palabra "chingar" es una voz polisémica en México.

-- «Mi Patria es todo lugar donde tengo amigos que quiero» Carlos Fuentes.

Tempo - El Tenochtitlanés
| >> A Denver Colorado newspaper article says this: | >> | >> " 'Chingaso' is Spanish street slang for "fight". | > | >If that's a brand of clothes, it'll go over big in my town. The | >misspelling won't matter. | > | >> I don't speak Spanish very much, but having grown up on the south | >> Texas/Mexican border, I think I disagree. | >> | >> It seems to me that 'un chingaso', used as a noun, has a meaning more | >> like a punch, or a strike, done in anger. | >> | >> I agree that 'chingaso' is slang.......probably from the verb | >> 'chingar'? | >> | >> I might be out of date, tho. | >> | >> Maybe 'chingaso' means something slightly different, today, in Denver | >> than it did on the Texas/Mexican border, back in the 50's and 60's. | >> | >> Comments? Maybe bring me up to date? | > | >The only meaning I've heard in northern New Mexico is the one you | >mention--a punch, a blow. In the plural, it could mean a fight, I | >guess. "He wanted chingazos" = "He wanted to fight." | | I would guess that, more generally, "chingazo" would be a big success | or a big failure. | | Regards, | Greybeard | -- | John Estill, Millersburg, Ohio, USA | Inglés nativo, español maomeno mexicano | "Uno tiene derecho a escoger a sus amigos, ¿no?" | -- Jaime 'Lucius Plotius' Sabater
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Greybeard:
[nq:1]Un "chingazo" es un golpe fuerte. Darle a alguien de chingazos, es darle de goles fuertes. Cómo ya has de saber, Grey; la palabra "chingar" es una voz polisémica en México.[/nq]
Cómo no, Tempo; aunque hace un par de años que no leo "El laberinto de la soledad" de don Octavio Paz, donde explica requete bien la palabra.

Saludos, Greybeard -- John Estill, Millersburg, Ohio, USA Inglés nativo, español maomeno mexicano "Uno tiene derecho a escoger a sus amigos, ¿no?" -- Jaime 'Lucius Plotius' Sabater
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Tempo:
| On Tue, 02 Sep 2003 04:45:32 GMT, "Tempo" (Email Removed) | wrote: | | >Un "chingazo" es un golpe fuerte. Darle a alguien de chingazos, es darle de goles fuertes.

...es darle golpes fuertes, no goles...
Es tiempo de darle una repasadita, ¿no? ;-) ;-) ;-). BTW. Did you notice my mistake above??? :-)
-- «Mi Patria es todo lugar donde tengo amigos que quiero» Carlos Fuentes.

Tempo - El Tenochtitlanés
[nq:2]Saludos, Greybeard -- John Estill, Millersburg, Ohio, ... sus amigos, ¿no?" -- Jaime 'Lucius Plotius' Sabater[/nq]
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